Tag Archives: fashion pr

Check it out: Interview with Jenelle Hamilton, The Publicist

Hello PR peeps, I’m still here! I had a rough week last week and I threw in the towel, but the towel got washed and was thrown right back to me, so I’m here!

Jenelle Hamilton, The Publicist

Today I have a special treat for you! I spoke with Jenelle Hamilton, the Publicist a few days ago and she was nice enough to give me some great advice and an interview that I want to share with my readers!

**INSPIRATION ALERT** If you’re anything like me (young, and determined), you WILL be inspired by Jenelle’s words…so let’s get started:

Where did you go to school? I went to school in the UK, at the University of Greenwich, I studied communications.

How did you get started? My first job out of college was at a non-profit where I learned all the basics of PR—writing press releases, media pitching, etc. Eventually, I wanted to combine my love of PR and fashion (Miss Hamilton worked at Prada on the weekends through school…trés chic) and went to work for Karla Otto, an international fashion PR agency. I worked there for 3 years and wanted to move into beauty, so I moved to New York 7 years ago and got a job!

How did you get into freelancing? I worked in beauty for awhile and then found that I got bored and wanted to do my own thing; so I freelanced on the beauty side, but I returned to an agency after awhile and then I decided go out on my own and have been doing it for two and half to three years.

What is your biggest accomplishment thus far of your career? Landing Bob Mackie as a client—he’s a living legend and a true celebrity designer. They found me to work on a project, but then I was able to stay on as a global PR director. The other accomplishment was being on E! Television’s docuseries, Playing with Fire. I’m not an actress and I don’t want to be famous, but it was great for my brand.

Favourite part of the job? Every single day is different, I have a celebrity charity client, I have Bob Mackie; I also have hair and beauty client, and everything in between. I have so many different things going on; it just depends on what comes through my email that day. I learned a long time ago, I can’t be in a 9-5 job, every single day.

Least favourite part of the job? I hate going to meetings; I like to schedule conference calls as much as possible, especially with the new technology, I think it’s more efficient than having so many face-to-face meetings.

What do you think sets candidates apart in the entry-level job hunt? Show that you are going to work hard; I think this younger generation has shown that it is entitled and that they just want to do the glam side of PR; but I don’t do that every day, most of work is writing and behind the scenes stuff. Show that you are driven and are willing to work hard and being proactive. Even if you aren’t working, keep doing professional things and show that they are willing to work. That will set you apart.

What advice do you have for someone in terms of interning for free? I interned for free and worked 7 days a week; I worked Monday through Saturday and then I worked at an agency 1 day a week, and even had a second job!—if you want something you have to work for it and make sacrifices. Think long term and don’t think about now, think about the big picture. How bad do you want it?

What is one piece of advice you have for aspiring PR professionals? You can’t be shy; you have to be a performer. That’s why I created “Jenelle the publicist” because it’s still me, it’s just a more outgoing me. I think you have to be fun; you have to be high energy and be able to turn it on. Be able to tap into your performer.

What are key lessons you have learned in your career? There are a lot of ups and downs in this business, and some days you are going to want to give u. But if you’re passionate, you have to keep going. People don’t realize ow much work is involved in running their own business, and how much commitment is involved. They look at me and say, “Look at Jenelle, she’s so successful” but they haven’t seen the blood, sweat and tears that went into my business.

Is she amazing or what?! If you want to keep following Jenelle, then you can find her on her website, Facebook, Youtube, Linkedin, Instagram and Twitter

As you can see, Miss Hamilton had oodles of advice to offer and I can definitely say that speaking with her really lifted me up and got me excited and thinking about MY next steps.

I can’t wait to continue sharing this journey with you all and maybe some more interview? We’ll see!

Until next time!

XOXO, Jess AsPRing

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The Senior Chronicles, Part III: The Perfect Entry-Level Résumé

Hey there peeps, have I got a treat for you! Today we are going to be talking about the one document that can make or break your career: the résumé.  A résumé is the meat of the “career packet sandwich”: it doesn’t matter how great your portfolio is, how well-polished and personalized your cover letter is or how great you interact with the agency on Twitter, if your résumé doesn’t put foreward the best picture of you? It’s a done deal. Luckily for you, I have called in the big guns to give us some help: Jessica H. Hernandez is the founder and CEO of Great Resumes Fast, an online résumé consultancy that delivers brilliant résumés for all industries at all levels, at a very reasonable price. Additionally, Jessica (who has a fantastic name, if I do say so myself) is a nationally-recognized résumé expert, appearing in International Business TimesMSN.comMonster.com, etc. Basically, her advice is golden and I’ve got the exclusive scoop for you in 5…4…3..2…

  1. Should an entry-level resume be in chronological order or in order of most relevant experience? How much of our past experience should we include? It really depends on each job seeker’s job search goals but 99% of the time you always want to include the most relevant information in the top portion of the resume and then follow it with a chronological listing of your previous experience. Additionally, you should include up to ten years of past work experience but most entry level job seekers won’t have that long of a work history. So include what you do have at the time.
  2. Please make or break a myth for us: should our entry-level resume only be one page? Most entry-level resumes are only one page because of limited work history not because of a resume rule that stipulates it should only be one page. There is no rule that your resume has to stick to one page.
  3. What are some good tips for what to put on an entry-level resume that does not have much experience? You can include relevant coursework, internships, volunteer experience, and relevant extracurricular activities if they are professional and would help you in finding a job.
  4. How do we highlight our strengths against more experienced (ie, a few years out of school, etc.) competitors? Always emphasize your relevant experience and expertise. Speak to the needs of the employer. How has your past experience equipped you to successfully tackle the challenges that this employer is facing? If you can prove that you can overcome their obstacles you’ve suddenly positioned yourself as the most desirable candidate.
  5. How will social media and personal branding play into our resumes? How much weight should we, as entry-level job seekers, put into it? If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile you need to get one. It’s the number one way recruiters are finding candidates – even entry level ones! You should always seek to “brand” yourself. Even if you have very little actual work experience you still have gifts, talents, and skills that are marketable to employers and that make you unique and unlike any other candidate. Focus on marketing those.

Well, you heard it hear first people: “one-page résumé only” is a total myth and you need to get on Linkedin, ASAP. Jessica is a great resource and you can connect with her on Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin. She’s a great resource and regularly publishes great info and articles. I’m known to be pretty helpful, myself 😉 so don’t forget to connect with me!

The next Senior Chronicles will deal with social media and your résumé, how much is too much? Should you put your Twitter on your résumé? We’ll answer all of these q’s and more!

Until next time!

XOXOXO, Jess_AsPRing

Is Silence Golden? The Curious Case of Jeremy Scott

Happy Friday! If you’re like me and follow the news (and Heaven-help me, I hope you do!) then you might have heard about designer Jeremy Scott lately. Short story: Jeremy Scott is a pop culture designer who collaborates with Adidas on some pretty wild (and sometimes controversial) designs. His Fall 2013 collection, was par-the-course for this ecletic designer: ghoulish cartoon prints, bright colors, punchy prints; but someone (or rather, several someone’s) noticed something “off” about Scott’s prints: they closely mirrored those of Skateboard design legend Jimbo Phillips, as illustrated in the now-infamous photo below (which Jimbo posted to his own Facebook page with the caption, “this is crazy!”):

Photo belongs to  Jimbo Phillips, Jeremy Scott

Since the release of the damning images, Robert A. Denike, President of NHS, Inc./Santa Cruz Skateboards (which sells Jimbo’s iconic designs) released a statement admonishing Scott and saying (in no uncertain terms) that they were seeking “legal options”.

Now the thing is, this is a serious crisis situation for Jeremy Scott’s people; there is a lot of damning evidence that Scott duplicated a number of Phillips’ designs and plenty of publications have picked the story up (with images EEK!). But Scott has yet to release a single statement, and in fact, one look over their social media pages, it seems business as usual; whats going on?! We’re often taught that  in crisis situations, we should get out in front of it and develop a strategy and release a statement and so on and so forth, but what can Scott say?

With so much evidence and Phillips’ heavy following (apparently the skate subculture is stronger than ever), what could Scott say that wouldn’t make himself look worse than he does now? The answer is: probably nothing. “Oops, my bad” ain’t gonna cut it here folks, and with the introduction of legalities, well it’s probably best that both parties keep their statements at a minimum. As the public, we can only  speculate what either party is thinking or will do as they move forward. What we do know is, this might just be one of the rare cases where silence is indeed golden.

What do you think? Should Jeremy Scott make a statement or is he right to keep quiet? What happens when plagiarism is done between two professionals? Is this even plagiarism? Let me know what you think!

Until next time, XOXOXO

Jess_AsPRing

Were the Oscar’s a PR “Win”? The REAl winners and losers.

Hello ladies and gents, last night was supposedly the “biggest night in Hollywood” and the stars were out in their finest; the entire cast of Les Mis performed after a powerhouse by Jennifer Hudson (she really stole the show), it was the night of the ingenue (Both Anne Hathaway and Jennifer Lawrence won in their respective categories, although I’m still #TeamSallyFields) and it was a night of good suprises: the great Barbara Streisand graced the Oscar’s stage for the first time in almost 30 years, Michelle Obama showed up and Seth MacFarlane didn’t piss anybody off. But who were the REAL winners and losers? I picked two and here they are:

BIG Oscar Winner: Real-time Marketing.
I’m serious you guys, real-time marketing won, hands down. Brands were working over time to make relevant, witty and engaging posts, images and tweets in a bid to lure fan engagement. One brand that always wins on that front is Oreo, they scored a big win with their  Superbowl Blackout Tweet and they continued last night with a few spots (here and here) with a few other brands jumping in, including: Sharpie, Starbucks, JcPenney’s, Visa and Stella Artois, among many others. Real-time marketing is here to stay people, yet another tenet in our “instantaneous/gimme now” culture. The Oscar goes to you RTM, now keep your acceptance speech short, because I hear they are playing Jaws music to get people off stage these days (which is hilarious)

BIG Oscar Loser: The Onion.
The Onion is an alternative cultural icon; the spoof newspaper has been churning out ridiculous and satirical headlines for decades skewering everybody from Presidents to pop culture cuties. At approximately 8:04PM last nigh, in the middle of the Oscar’s telecast, they tweeted the following, “Everyone else seems afraid to say it, but that Quvenzhané Wallis is kind of a cunt, right? #Oscars2013” and they lost every cool point they ever had. Like, ever. First of all, Quvenzhané Wallis is nine years old and her personality is still developing and have you ever met a nine-year old? They can be a little self-involved and cocky (for lack of a better term), so lay off, who comes for a nine-year old, really? And, she is the youngest person EVER to be nominated for an Oscar, Mr./Miss Tweet Writter, what have YOU done lately? When was the last time you broke a record? Don’t worry, I’ll wait…

Exactly. People are so busy trying to be “edgy” on Twitter that they are over-stepping their boundaries and saying things that are uncouth and down-right mean. Manners are still in people, don’t forget.

Well, those were my winners and losers from last night’s (pretty boring) Oscars…BTW, Sally Fields should have won, I mean…Anne Hathaway? Really. Ugh. Whatevs. Until next time.

XOXOXO,

Jess_AsPRing.

My first week in fashion and my final thoughts on Tumblr…

PR Couture’s Crosby Nick’s fantastic book on breaking into Fashion PR

Happy Saturday peeps! I haven’t done a Saturday post in ages, but I promised that I would give you some updates about my foray in fashion, so here I am. Also, I wanted to give you my final “nay” or “say” on Tumblr.

First things first: Fashion PR. I recently moved from a large PR agency in the tech division to a super boutique agency in fashion and accessories and my first week is over and…(drumroll please)…I LOVE IT! There’s a sample room (not like Vogue’s or anything, but still awesome), the girls are fun and I can really tell that with a little push, I can get on some good projects and get some coverage.

Cons: hmm…the biggest con I’ve had so far is that I’m loving fashion so much, I’m starting to sway on my ultimate goal of travel and hospitality PR. I have always had my mind on working in travel in some form (even when I was going to be a barrister, I was going into maritime law because they got to travel!), but fashion people travel and fashion has always been a soft spot for me. Also, boutique agencies mean less amenities, like I don’t get my own MacBook or scheduled training sessions.

Over all, this has been a great experience thusfar and I think I am going to try and intern the last 6 months I’m in the Bay Area and learn as much as possible.

Next item of business, Tumblr. Do you remember this post? I joined Tumblr (at Jessaspring.tumblr.com) and I said in a month or so, I’d report back. Well, we’re at the “or so” part and here’s what I think: Tumblr is fantastic and it’s very good for visual people, such as fashion designers and bloggers, artists, etc. but for little ‘ol PR-lovin’ me? Not so much.

I already have a blog (in case you haven’t noticed) and Tumblr is just another blogging site. I don’t think I’m going to delete the account, because some of fave people have Tumblrs, such as Alexis Rodriguez from the PR Closet and the DKNY PR Girl, but I won’t be updating regularly and I don’t think I want it to represent my overall “brand”. Also, between you and me, there are A LOT of NSFW (Not Suitable for Work) items on Tumblr!

That’s all I’ve got for today, it’s such a gorgeous day, I’m heading outside to enjoy it, ciao bellas!

XOXOXOXO, Jess_AsPRing

I’m a fashion publicist now…kinda; moving from one type of PR to another.

When you hear the words “fashion publicist” what do you think of? Well-helled, perfectly coiffed waifs running around NYFW?

Or how about kick-ass tell-it-like-it-is Kelly Cutrone, who’s mantra “if you have to cry, go outside” has turned her into a household name & author?

“Kell on Earth”

Chances are, you think of both of these, and in some cases, you’re probably right, but my dear followers, get ready for a NEW fashion PR face: MINES. That’s right, I moved out of the tech PR biz and into fashion and accessories at a boutique PR firm (not that I don’t find gizmos and gadgets awesome) and it’s only my first day, so I don’t know what the heck the future holds, but I’ve been doing some prep work in anticipation & I wanted to pass it along to you, in case YOU wanted to jump PR ship to a new kind of PR (because trust me, there are more tons of different kinds of PR you can do):

  1. Consume, consume, consume media: I cannot say this enough, you should be reading multiple publications in your field, daily. Now that I’m into fashion (lol, I mean professionally), I am following ALL the pubs, top fashion blogs and influencers.
  2. Learn who’s who: Start remembering the names of editors, journalists who wrote a story that might pertain to one of your clients, etc. I am about to start pinning articles I find online so that when I see a good story, I can keep it tucked away and then maybe use it to pitch the same journalist later. PR is all about relationships, knowing what’s up and being ready when it is time to strike, as my dad always says, “if you stay ready, you won’t have to get ready.”
  3. Change the content you share: I share a lot of content via this blog and (more so) my Twitter account, and when I was in tech, I shared a lot of…you guessed it, tech news. Now that I am in fashion (lol…it still sounds weird), I want to start sharing and interacting with fashion industry peeps.
  4. Keep using what you’ve got to get what ya’ need: Tech is a beast, I mean it is really hard. I’m not the only person who thinks so, the best advice I have gotten so far in my career is, “oh you’re in tech? Well, if you can do tech, you can do anything” and I kind of feel like it’s true: tech is a tough field and if you’re not “Google”, “Facebook” or “Apple” it can be an uphill battle. BUT, that has prepared me for fashion. I can take a lick and keep on going, I can tailor a pitch and I can find an angle in any story (thanks to my first boss, Crisel). I know fashion isn’t any easier, but it sure as heck can’t be harder than tech, right?
  5. Become like Spongebob Squarepants: I don’t mean live in a pineapple under the sea (because you would die, and my intern salary won’t be able to handle any wrongful death suits), I mean absorb as much as possible! You’re in a new game, honey and you don’t know all of the rules yet. So keep your eyes and ears open, take notes and ask as many questions as possible. New industry, new rules.

That’s all I’ve got for you today, but expect a post really soon about my initial thoughts on working in fashion PR. As always,

XOXOXO, Jess_AsPRing

p.s. I agree with Kelly Cutrone, if you have to cry, go outside ladies…it makes us all look bad!